Newgrange: A Royal Necropolis

The Megalith Builders divided the British Isles and Brittany into four quadrants, and built their main monuments on this territory in accordance with the symbolism associated with each cardinal point. The island of Ireland, in the west, was where they erected the royal necropolis.

The mound with a passage tomb called Newgrange is undoubtedly one of the most important and prominent megalithic monuments. Like Avebury and Carnac, the main stage of construction took place at the end of the 4th millennium BC. This monument is located on the north side of a large meander of the Boyne River in the eastern side of Ireland, along with other fine examples of mounds with passage tombs such as Knowth and Dowth.

The Megalith Builders understood life as a result of the union of two principles, solar and lunar (in classical mythology Apollo and Artemis), and, logically, they understood death as the result of their separation. The kings, like Orion, were considered demigods, possessed of an immortal spirit within a mortal body. The megalithic complex of Avebury and Stonehenge were designed to make sure that the kings should experience the same kind of immortality that Orion, that is, they should die to be reborn again as princes.

This unbroken maintenance of the royal lineage would be accomplished during the monarchical renewal ceremony, held every 19 years during the mayor lunar standstill (lunastice). This very special ceremony included the regicide, as I explained in the releases dedicated to Avebury and Stonehenge, but also the sacred union (hierosgamos) of the new kings and queens as explained in this new issue. The Y and Z Holes of Stonehenge were used to determine the most suitable time, depending on the cycles of the moon, to celebrate the sacred marriage.

Newgrange: A Royal Necropolis